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Number of items: 58.

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Forget Me Not Song

Song Lyrics written by members of the Forget Me Not Swindon Centre about their experience of having dementia. The resource contains different versions/formats of the song as the group have amended it to suit the different events where they have performed it.

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SWAPBox Promotional Poster

This is a promotional poster for the SWAPBox repository

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ALPS student observation assessment tool

This assessment tool is aimed at students and practice educators to record their commentary on observations done as part of their assessment of competence in practice. Students may also use it outside of formal observations as a reflective record of their own practice for discussion in supervision.This tool has also been adapted to fit with NQSW and Stage 1 and 2 practice educator training. It will be further adapted to fit with PCF. An evaluation of its use is available.

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E-learning presentation to engage learners and maximise participation

JSWEC/SWAP award winner, 2011 for innovative technology use. Power-point presentation covering main points of good practice in E-learning which supported real time release of case based problem solving.

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Symposium PP 2011: Critical issues in promoting equality for LGBT carers

Paper from 2011 Sexuality in Social Work Symposium

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IRISS Podcast: Setting the Scene for Change

Richard Murray, Senior Economic Adviser, Scottish Government. Critical Skills for Critical Times and conference and workshop organised by Moray Collaborative Learning Network, held at Moray College, 17th March 2011.

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Students as mentors: changing the next generation

This is a Powerpoint presentation from our part of a workshop session at JSWEC 2011. The session gave an overview of the research project with a focus on how we had drawn on Web2 technology in data collection and SWAPBox as a mode of dissemination.

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An ageing population: a success or a burden?

This short presentation is a discussion of the implications of population ageing for social policy. It is aimed at an inter-disciplinary audience of students and tutors interested in the consequences of population ageing.

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An ageing population: why and how is it happening?

This short presentation is an introduction to the causes behind population ageing, and it is aimed at a broad, inter-disciplinary audience of students and tutors interested in ageing over the lifecourse.

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PITSTOP - LILAC 2011 Conference presentation - Slideshow

Slideshow that accompanied presentation of preliminary findings of the PITSTOP project to the LILAC 2011 information literacy conference held at the British Library on 19 April 2011. Note that these are mostly images - please refer to the accompanying notes for further information.

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PITSTOP - Supporting Students on Social Work Placements Using Social Media

Information about a SWAP funded project at De Montfort University to explore the use of social media to support students on social work practice placements.

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Collaborative working for safeguarding children -- workshop activities

Frances Gordon and Hilary Pengelly presented the activities detailed here at a jointly funded SWAP and HSP event. Delegates enjoyed the event and comments incldued: 'I will certainly use de Bonos six thinking hats with my students. I have found the whole session very motivational and have serveral atrategies to take back and use with my students'. Delegates also found the pointers on how to use mateiral from serious case reviews very useful.

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Children HIV in South Afirca

The goal of this session was to get students was to get students to think about the impact that a lack of policy and action can have. It also helps them to think about the impact of for example the migration of medical staff from the developing to the developed world and ends with a challenge

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Experience of older migrants

This is a poower point created by Greame Simpson and Sue Lawrence that illustrates a typology of older migrants.

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Transcultural social work culturally sensitive practice

This powerpoint produced by Hellmut Weich includes photographs and exercises designed to familiarise students with the African experience of social work

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Journeys - who makes them and why

These powerpoint slides produced by Janet Williams support an undergraduate lecture on migration

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The student learning experience - what exactly do they learn and what exactly do they experience?

This is a presentation I gave at the Joint Social Work Education Conference 2010. It outlines my theoretical proposition for 'creative pedagogy' and invites evaluation, contributions and comments from participants. The presntation includes the notes to myself, so they're not complte and comprehensive, but i hope they illuminate the slides to some extent. Please do let me know what you think about the proposition. I'd love to hear from you

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Can online discussions be used as a tool to shape the learning experience of student social workers?

"One of the great untested assumptions of current educational practice is that students learn through discussion." (Laurillard 2003:158) This paper explores student social workers’ perceptions of learning from participation in online discussions and analyses how these can be used most effectively to develop understanding about interpersonal communication. The research context was a communication unit on a social work degree course in which teacher-designed discussion questions followed each teaching session. Student questionnaires were analysed and the results compared with a grounded theory analysis of online postings (Strauss and Corbin 1998). Research shows that despite the potential for online discussions to stimulate deep learning, this remains elusive (Wallace 2003). This paper reviews the literature examining why evidence of complex engagement with ideas is difficult to locate in online discussions, and how meaningful discussion can be encouraged. Findings from this study suggest that participating in online discussions is an emotive experience for students. A model using online discussion to teach communication skills is proposed, building on the work of Gunawardena et al (1998). In the proposed model the links between ‘process knowledge’ (how students communicate with each other online and how they experience this) and ‘content knowledge’ (the curriculum) are used as learning material. It is argued that deeper learning may result from examination of this dynamic. The paper concludes that it may not be useful to search for evidence of deep learning in online discussions alone. Learning about communication should be considered as a cumulative process involving group interaction through online discussions, followed by individual reflection and application in social work practice. Further research to investigate applications of this model in social work education is needed. References Gunawardena, C N, Lowe, C A, Anderson, T. (1998)Transcript analysis of computer mediated conferences as a tool for testing constructivist and social constructivist learning theories, Paper presented at the Annual Conference on Distance Learning and Teaching Madison WI Aug 5-7 Laurillard, D. (2003) Rethinking University Teaching, 2nd Edition London and New York: RoutledgeFalmer Strauss,A and Corbin, J.M (1998) Basics of Qualitative Research: Techniques and Procedures for Developing Grounded Theory, Thousand Oaks Calif:Sage Wallace, R M. (2003) Online learning in Higher Education: A review of research on interactions among teachers and students, Education, Communication and Information, 3:2

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Making connections: using an on-line interactive website to enhance service user involvement

Paper presented at 2009 JSWEC Conference. It’s more like learning together, being on an equal footing, using our collective mind (Comment by service user, 2009) The (abridged) story of service user and carer involvement in professional programmes at a distance learning university is presented here to illustrate the complexity of issues of identity and the context of the power relationships in which they are enacted. This paper will explore issues of identity in service user and carer involvement through reflection on roles, relationships and communication between service users, carers, tutors and academic managers as they have evolved during a five year period of joint work. Early work focused on initial engagement and setting the framework and tone of involvement. The second phase involved a task-centred approach, concentrating on specific tasks in the development and implementation of the honours social work degree, an on-going project. Service user and carer roles across the social work programme are identified and explored. Relationships are described as ‘co-learners’ in a process of development and discovery. A third stage sees the extension of the group to include colleagues from the wider Health and Social Care Faculty and the development of an on-line interactive website - a wiki- in combination with local face to face networks of service users and carers. This is an attempt to reach out to geographically dispersed populations and to make connections with under-represented groups. There will be an analysis of roles, relationships and communication strategies to extend the reach of service user and carer involvement. By illustration there will be a demonstration of the wiki and presentation of ‘job’ descriptions contained therein to identify opportunities for involvement and two-way influence, followed by discussion of issues of identity, inter-professional involvement and the benefits and limitations of on-line communication.

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Juxtaposing disciplines and conquering interdisciplinary research challenges: the researcher’s perspective

Conference paper - JSWEC Social Work Research Conference University of Hertfordshire - 9th July 2009

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Promoting a global knowledge sharing environment: development of an on-line community of practice between social work lecturers in the UK and India.

Paper presented at 2008 JSWEC Conference. An analysis of social work curriculum delivery in the UK appears to focus predominantly on UK society and practice. Social work has tended to be a locally specific discipline that has focussed on geographically bounded legislation, political configurations, economic frameworks, culture and norms (Dominelli, 2000). This may seem necessary as the majority of social work students will practice within their country of educational origin. However, it is also increasingly important that social work students gain knowledge of an international perspective due to the increasing globalised nature of social work together with an increasing transient social work population. Indeed, Dominelli and Bernard (2203, p.26) argue that: the theorisation of international social work and its impact on international exchanges in linking the global and the local has not been given high priority...This limited approach to internationalising social work has short-changed the profession... For a few social work students it is possible to gain first hand accounts of social work theory and practice from an international perspective through student exchange systems (Tesoriero and Rajaratnam, 2001). However, the majority of teaching and learning relies heavily on knowledge that is transferred from lecturer to student and, therefore, it is vital that lecturers gain an understanding of social work from a global view. This research adopts an action research perspective by facilitating first hand exchanges in dialogue between social work lecturers at Anglia Ruskin University, UK, and social work lecturers from the University of Mumbai, India. A on-line web based Community of Practice has been designed and has facilitated a collaborative inquiry over a one year period. The presentation will consider the setting up of the study: finding a collaborator; designing a web based Community of Practice; dominant themes arising from the collaboration. It will finally consider the impact on social work lecturer participants in relation to their continual professional development and how this gained knowledge is shared with their respective student population. References: Dominelle, L. (2000) 'International Comparisons in Social Work' in Pierce, R. and Weinstein, J. (eds) Innovative Education and Training for Care Professionals. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishing Dominelli, L. and Bernard, T.W. (2003) Broadening Horizons: International Exchanges in Social Work. London: Ashgate Tosoriero, F. and Rajaratnam, A. (2001) Partnership in education: An Australian school of social work and a South Indian primary health care project. International Social Work 44(1) pp.31-41

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Complexity: a model for inter-professional education in medicine and social work

Paper presented at 2009 JSWEC Conference. Klein (2004) has summarised accurately the realities of professional practice by suggesting that the problems practitioners face are marked by unpredictability, ambiguity, turbulence and uncertainty. The tragic case of Baby P, like that of Victoria Climbie, has underlined these demands yet again. Both these cases evidence the need for social work and medical practitioners to work together collaboratively, communicating clearly and understanding each other’s language, perspectives and assessments. In qualifying training the need to prepare social work and medical students for practice in these difficult environments and to enable them to develop collaborative attributes is essential. Moving beyond policy requirements in relation to inter-professional practice and learning, this paper proposes that complexity theory should play a central role in the theorisation of inter-professional learning and practice. Informed, inter alia, by the notions of attractors, simple-rules, self-organisation and emergence, it is argued that more emphasis should be placed upon creating receptive conditions and contexts which will support and facilitate good collaborative working. The paper also reports case studies of learning and teaching where medical and social work students work together early in their training, and together consider the difficult realities of service user/ patient need, whilst exploring key skills for joint working. The importance of incorporating openness to collaborative practice as students develop and negotiate their professional identify is highlighted, as is the part played by teaching staff in modelling collaboration. Reference Klein JT (2004) 'Interdisciplinarity and Complexity: an evolving relationship'. Emergence: Complexity & Organization 6:1-2 pp2-10

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Raising our Research Game - the Researcher Development Initiative Phase 2

Paper presented at 2008 JSWEC Conference. In this paper I shall provide an update on the recently funded ESRC RDI 2 project entitled 'Increasing the Competence and Confidence of Social Work Researchers II: An Action-learning Programme to Develop Research Capacity'. This project builds on the successful ESRC Researcher Development Initiative Phase I Project in 2006 aimed at increasing the research capacity of social work researchers. It was made on behalf of JUCSWEC in collaboration with SCIE,the Scottish Institute for Excellence in Social Work Education (SIESWE), and the Social Work and Policy (SWAP) HEA subject centre. The pioneering work on the application of scoping studies and systematic reviews to social work and social care by SCIE is being used as one of three platforms to launch this intensive development programme over two years. The second platform explores the value of mixing methods specifically to build the evidence base for the discipline. The third platform focuses on quasi-experimentation and instrument design, specifically aimed at social work research. SCIE and other research organisations are providing a number of 'placements', offering participants the experience of learning first-hand about systematic reviews. An innovation is the use of action-learning sets to support participants transform fledgling ideas into fully designed and costed proposals, ready for submission to funding bodies (especially the ESRC). Participants have already been invited to apply to join one of a number of action learning sets over the two years. They will also be offered regular support through the use of a buddy system, and a list of mentors to include experienced social work researchers with a record of securing and managing high-quality, externally-funded research. Lectures, seminars and workshops will be video- and audio-recorded using technology capable of producing downloadable files for subsequent transmission to laptops, Mac/PCs, iPods and MP3 formats.

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Religious nurture in Muslim families: implications for social work

Paper presented at 2010 JSWEC Conference. The significance of religion and spirituality for social work practice is now quite often acknowledged in academic writing, although arguably it is not yet so well recognised in routine social work practice. Western academic writing in social work books and journals tend to emphasise an individualised version of spirituality which is reasonably comfortable for secular liberals. This presentation will argue, on the basis of research with Muslim families about the religious nurture of children, that when social work practitioners are interacting with Muslim service users, they need to be aware of the importance of formal religion, rather than spirituality in any individualised Western sense. Although Muslim families are diverse in their belief and practice, the dominant world view tends to be an unwavering monotheism and conformity to religious texts. The presentation will draw on a research project from the AHRC/ESRC Religion and Society programme. This involved secondary analysis of the Home Office Citizenship Survey and multi-method qualitative research with 60 Muslim families across a wide spectrum of ethnicity and social class. The presentation will focus on the implications of the research findings for child and family social work.

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Workshop: Interprofessional and interagency collaboration; experiences of developing an elearning resource

Paper Presented at JSWEC 2009 Conference. This workshop will provide the opportunity for participants to learn about the challenges experienced in developing materials for e-learning. Participants will be able to have hands on experience of a new e-learning resource on ‘interprofessional and inter-agency collaboration’ (IPIAC) and to consider its usefulness for effective teaching and learning. The authors of the resource will share their experiences of the process of developing the e-learning materials. They will reflect on the different domains, discourses and identities the project brought together, including those involving: the commissioners, the developers, subject material authors and peer reviewers. The presenters will explore how the process of continued negotiation and learning required, was managed to create the resource. Several factors produced tensions and opportunities during the content writing and technical development of the resource, relating to the expectations of the people and organisations involved in producing the resource. These factors included: prioritising the needs of potential learners, the variable development of the current knowledge and research base, the creative possibilities and limitations of e-learning, the different perspectives of the authors, the timescale of the project and the technical demands of translating IPIAC ideas into an e-learning resource. Discussion will explore parallels between the subject content of interprofessional and interagency collaboration, and the process of producing the e-learning resource with people from different professional backgrounds and organisations; both involving learning to work together effectively. Following a presentation by the authors and discussion about the process of producing e-learning materials, participants will be able to use the resource, comment on the experience and offer feedback on the potential application of the resource in their curricula.

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Research Ethics Review and the Mental Capacity Act 2005: Safeguarding people or stifling research?

Paper presented at 2009 JSWEC Conference. The implementation of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 has implications for social researchers as well as health and medical research. The Act, however, is focused on the latter and Ethics Review for social research, where people may lack decision-making capacity to take part, presents complexities that have not yet been fully addressed. This paper reports a study of social work researchers’ involvement in university research ethics committees where the capacity of participants may be an issue. The findings suggest that perceived implications of the Act may inadvertently stifle important research and, if not carefully negotiated, the use of Research Ethics Review may prevent rather than enable people to become involved in research as participants. This may infringe the rights of people to participate in research and, therefore, may detract from the principles of the Act in presuming and enabling capacity where possible. The research was undertaken in two stages. A web-based search and documentary analysis of a sample of university research ethics committees’ policies and procedures determined current practice. The second stage involved semi-structured interviews with social work/social care researchers likely to be involved in areas covered by the Act. These interviews were thematically analysed to explore how ethical issues were considered, whether explicit account was taken of the Mental Capacity Act and in what ways the Act was believed potentially to impact on future research proposals. The study suggests there has been little attention to the implications of the Act so far by social work researchers, but where it has been considered problems have been identified. This paper makes some suggestions for negotiating university research ethics committees and making positive use of the Mental Capacity Act in developing research proposals where capacity may be an issue.

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Tracking the needs of newly-qualified social workers (NQSWs), in children and families settings, to identify the elements of induction that best support initial professional development in the workplace

Paper presented at 2008 JSWEC conference. The stimulus for this small, empirical study involving three statutory agencies in the south-west of England was provided by the convergence of important changes in 2006/07 to qualifying and post-qualifying education and training in social work, with the first graduates emerging from new degrees, and the implementation of the revised PQ framework, which stipulates a first 'consolidation module' in a specific area of specialist practice. Transferring these ideas into the workplace as part of the 'seamless continuum' envisaged for professional development presented a number of questions about the induction of newly-qualified social workers(NQSWs). A mix of methods was used to obtain quantitative and qualitative data from NQSWs, first line managers and staff development officers. Key themes emerging from initial postal questionnaires were used to inform the delivery of two sets of face-to-face semi-structured interviews with line managers and NQSWs, at six and twelve months into first employment. The study revealed a journey of transition and change, across three inter-related dimensions - personal, organisational and professional - each of which provided rewards as well as producing tensions. The personal dimension was one in which students emerging from their final placements found that the learning was not over and transition into the workplace, carrying full responsibility for a social work caseload, as well as an organisational identity, was stressful and demanding of personal resources. These experiences are explored in relation to new entrants to other professions, notably diplomate and graduate nurses and newly-qualified teachers. The organisational dimension was one in which change, both structural and procedural, appeared endemic. NQSWs faced high levels of organisational turbulence as social services departments metamorphose into services for children and young people. Management theory underpinning the development of learning organisations is used to inform understanding of the study findings and formulate suggestions for action. The professional dimension was no less beset with change with national induction standards, the review of roles and tasks, career grades and progression all coming to the fore. Discussion of the professional aspirations of NQSWs and first line managers is linked to these national debates, touching on definitions of social work and professional identity and status. Latterly, proposals by CWDC to develop a 'probationary year' for NQSWs resonatae with the issues which stimulated the study and with a number of its findings.

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New Horizons? Shaping learning and teaching about mental health: from specialist module to mainstream learning

This presentation puts the case for embedding learning about mental health and well-being throughout the social work curriculum. Presented by Jill Anderson and Hilary Burgess to the Joint Social Work Education Conference in 2010

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Achieving collaborative competence through inter-professional education. Lessons learned from joint training in learning disability nursing and social work

The ability to work interprofessionally is integral to professional education and training in social work. Emphasis is placed on students undertaking specific learning and assessment in partnership working and information sharing across professional disciplines (DH, 2002). This implies that aspects of inter-professional education (IPE) should be included within social work training in order that students acquire skills in effective collaborative practice (QAA, 2008). But how can social work education best address this when much of it is singular in nature and most social work students spend the majority of their undergraduate experience mainly in the company of other social work students? This paper begins by exploring the theoretical principles underpinning inter-professional education. A number of themes will be discussed which are highlighted in the literature relating to the aims and outcomes of IPE. Drawing on doctoral research which evaluated the perspectives of graduates who had undertaken joint training in learning disability nursing and social work, the paper will move on to evaluate the skills and knowledge they acquired through this particular model of IPE. It will consider what can be learned from their experience which may be applied to the development of social work students more generally. The paper will argue that there is much to be learned from this alternative model of professional training, in particular about how interprofessional experiences and reflection on them can support the development of critical perspectives in social work graduates. References Department of Health. 2002. Requirements for Social Work Training. London, DH. Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education. 2008. Social Work Subject Benchmark Statement. Gloucester, QAA.

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Developing an e-portfolio for the Consolidation Module (PQ)

Paper presented at 2009 JSWEC Conference. The School of Social Work at Kingston University/ St George's University of London and North West and South West London Skills for Care sub regions were awarded a Skills for Care Post Qualifying (PQ) Innovation Fund project in January 2008 for the development of a pilot system for an electronic portfolio for the PQ Module ‘Consolidation'. The aim of this piece of work was to develop and pilot a web-based e-portfolio, which, if successful, could be shared with other universities across London providing 'consolidation'. It was also aimed to promote line managers’ engagement in PQ studies, by enabling them to access and track their staff member’s progress on the portfolio and requiring them to contribute to the assessment of their work. The e-portfolio was designed by a steering group of the partners, including representatives of Kingston University’s Service Users and Carers Advisory group. A company, VIS, which had previously worked on Skills for Care projects in the Midlands, was commissioned by the group to develop the electronic portfolio as a web-based system. The pilot has now been completed and evaluated (February 2009). This presentation will report on the outcomes of this pilot, its evaluation, some of the challenges experienced, lessons learnt and consider the potential of e-portfolios for PQ levels - a suitable medium or not?

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Is it the individual student who fails to progress or the individual programme that fails to respond?

Paper presented at 2009 JSWEC Conference. Social work courses recruit a higher proportion of students from different black and minority groups than many other courses. However, national statistics continue to demonstrate that some groups of students do not progress through social work training at the same rate as other students. Students from black and ethnic minority groups and disabled students have a significantly higher rate of referral and deferral than other groups of students and the recruitment, progression and achievement of men is worsening. Representatives from the GSCC multi-agency project group Diversity, Progression and Achievement which includes students, people who use services, carers, programme providers and other stakeholders will share their understanding of the recent findings from the research carried out by the Social Care Workforce Research Unit (Hussein et al 2009) with whom they have been collaborating. Further evidence will be presented from the latest social work degree annual monitoring exercise carried out by the GSCC. This examines what HEIs report they are doing to support vulnerable groups. Initial analysis suggests that problems in progression are more likely to be identified and responded to as individual issues. The paper explores what the implications are for universities, students, stakeholders and the regulatory body and poses How effectively are universities responding to the needs of those groups who are not progressing as they should? How can the GSCC become more effective in regulating and promoting equality requirements? How can HEIs continue to measure, monitor and improve their own progress in this area? Reference: Shereen Hussein, Jo Moriarty, Jill Manthorpe (2009) Variations in the Progression of Social Work Students in England, Social Care Workforce Research Unit, Kings College London/ General Social Care Council Full report - www.gscc.org.uk/NR/rdonlyres/B5A5B087-E7B9-471C-BAAF-207DA1FBE1DA/0/Progression_analysis_FT_UG.pdf Executive Summary - www.gscc.org.uk/NR/rdonlyres/E4482365-4F9F-46F0-9238-A030302E0ED7/0/Progression_analysis_FT_UG_0305__Executive_Summary.pdf

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Reflections on Identity: the Prerequisites for Professional Strength and Creativity

Paper presented at 2010 JSWEC Conference Writing in 1942, as America faced the crisis of joining World War II, Bertha Reynolds argued "The best preparation for adapting to the social work of the future, or to its absence if the good life of that time has no need for it, is to see it now, without illusions, as a part of our own time, and to face what we have with an active determination to be flexible enough ourselves so that we do not hold back its growth into something else". Sixty years later, these words resonate, at a time of what might be describes as ‘perpetual crisis’, within the profession and in the broader society within which social work is defined and practiced. This presentation offers social work practitioners and educators the opportunity to reflect on the context, social, economic, political and spiritual, local and global, that shapes social work practice. It asks: 1. What measures, personal, professional and organisational, must be implemented for practitioners to ‘hold the faith’ as brokers of hope for the poor and marginalised in this fluid, contested and arguably risk saturated practice environment; 2. What new (and perhaps old but neglected) capacities and/or philosophies can assist and nourish them; and 3. What educational strategies, pre- and post-qualifying, are necessary to develop the intellectual rigour, emotional strength and integrity necessary for empowered and creative practice. Bertha Capon Reynolds (1942) Learning and Teaching in the Practice of Social Work National Association of Social Workers, Silver Spring; Russell & Russell, New York

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Stories and lessons from a study of the enhancement of learning process on a social work degree programme

Paper presented at 2009 JSWEC Conference. There are increasing signs of a deepened and broadened interest in how the integration of learning can be enhanced. Our exploration of the integration of learning began five years ago and has previously published on how academic contact with social work students during placements can bridge the gap between theory and practice. We have continued our work on the place and role of academics in the enhancement of student learning (e.g. the tutor - student relationship) and have now gone on to seek the views of finishing students as to the most helpful people, moments and processes in the enhancement of their learning. We will present preliminary results and observations from a two-year study during which the views of two similar cohorts of students were sought. The first results provide something of a wake-up call for academics with the message being that: If social work ‘can’t go on doing more of the same’ (Changing Lives, 21st Century Review of Social Work 2006) then social work educationalists also can’t continue to act as though it were the 19th century. The belief that transmission of information equals student learning needs to go the same way as Gowns and Latin. The findings from our research will be interesting for training officers, trainers and practice teachers and constitute something of urgency for lecturers and tutors.

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Engaging PQ students with different prior academic experiences in successful learning.

Paper presented at JSWEC 2009 Conference. It seems that students' capacity to benefit from the learning experience is influenced by their previous level of study, previous successes, the length of time since they last studied, their perception of the relevance of the study to their professional development and by the support they receive from their employer. This paper will describe our preliminary findings from a project looking at the satisfaction of students undertaking Post-Qualifying (PQ) Awards in Social Work with Children, Young People their Families and Carers. These students are qualified social workers who are currently in practice. Their qualification may be either a Diploma in Social Work (BA Levels 1 and 2) or a Bachelors Degree in Social Work (BA Levels 1,2 and 3). We have observed dissatisfaction with the entry modules to the programme from some students who feel that they are not receiving enough ‘teaching’. These students appear to be those with Diploma qualifications who have not previously studied at BA, level 3 and specifically have not undertaken an undergraduate dissertation which can be argued develops autonomous learners. Students undertaking any continuous professional development are under the scrutiny of their employers and if they are finding these studies difficult are likely to blame this on the course provider rather than expose their own capacity. This is therefore an important area to investigate as these students need the PQ qualifications and this may be best achieved by pre-course preparation programmes, to develop capacity, for some candidates. If our hypothesis is correct this will also lead to improvement in student satisfaction and completion rates.

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Personalisation - workshop powerpoint

Personalisation: Interpersonal Skills for Practitioners As the ‘personalisation agenda’ in social work gathers pace at the level of policy and service provision, there is an increasing need for individual practitioners to re-acquaint themselves with the skills and values of working with diversity and understanding the perspectives of other people and other lives across all service user groups. This workshop will introduce participants to a range of reflexive enquiry methods that draw upon the seminal ideas from Personal Construct Psychology (PCP). The main aim of PCP methodologies is to enable the practitioner to ‘stand in the shoes’ of their client - to see the world in the same way their client does, using the client’s language and the client’s ‘personal constructs’. Everyone has their own system of personal constructs and these are the ‘goggles’ through which they construe the world in which they live and which govern their behaviour. The value of a PCP perspective for social work is that it helps the practitioner to focus upon ways in which, in order to help people to change their behaviour, we have to help them to become aware of how they see themselves and key aspects of their social worlds. This workshop will offer opportunities for participants to examine their own personal constructs and try out 3 basic techniques that will demonstrate: • how personal constructs are used to differentiate between people, situations and things • how someone’s personal constructs can be explored to understand their personal and professional core values • how personal constructs inform behavioural choices - why, at some level of awareness, a person chooses to behave in the ways that they do, rather than in ways that we might consider to be better for them The workshop will be of practical use to students, practitioners and anyone interested in practice learning. Presenters: Dr Barry Cooper, The Open University, UK Nick Reed, University of Hertfordshire, UK

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Introduction to SWAPBox Presentation

This PowerPoint presentation was used at a recent SWAP workshop to introduce new users to the SWAPBox repository. It could be used by anyone looking to give a quick overview of the repository. Also included are three sets of exercises for novice users of SWAPBox to start trying different functionalities of the repository - these should be done in conjunction with the relevant 'How to Guides' in the Getting Started Section of SWAPBox. The exercises also include a brief feedback form for users to reflect on the ease of completing the different tasks.

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mental health acronym checker

A list of about twenty acronyms that emerged during the course of teaching a module on mental health on a social work qualifying programme (answers in the notes!). Some of the acronyms link directly to websites that give further information, though these links will only be live as long as the websites themselves exist. Some of the sites are local to Hampshire as this was the location of the course. I would love you to add a few more examples. i used this as a quick quiz at teh end of the module and, although great fun, it also served as a reminder to students of some of the content of previous sessions

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The need for Theory to underpin Social Work Practice.

This powerpoint presentation is used on the consolidation module of the post qualifying social work programme.

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Substance Misuse and Young People

A powerpoint presentation which details the incidence of drug and alcohol use by young people in the UK. The presentation looks at issues of consent for treatment and the harm minimisation model.

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The beginnings of human development - a teacher's OER journey

a resource for use in teaching the beginnings of human development, together with an accompanying narrative of the journey into making the resource an OER

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Web 2.0 Lecture PowerPoint

Lecture ppt designed to introduce students to some key Web 2.0 services. Includes some information, links & useful questions. Really a test upload as this resource needs setting in context to be useful.

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SWAPBox Overview

This PowerPoint presentation giving an overview to the SWAPBox repository was delivered at the SWAPBox launch event in November 2010. It includes information on the project partners and project timescale, available features in SWAPBox and an outlook to future developments.

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Compromise and Creativity

Paper about Employers, Service Users, Carers and a University Developing the PQ Higher Specialist Level Mental Health Programme. Presented at the 2008 JSWEC Conference

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Beyond happy faces - evaluating the impact of training on practice

Paper presented at JSWEC Conference 2008. Social workers are required to undertake continuing professional development to maintain their registration (GSCC 2006). Employers are also expected to provide opportunities for continuing professional development to their staff (GSCC 2002, no 3.3) and many spend considerable resources providing in-service training courses as one way of fulfilling this. Questions remain whether what courses teach is actually used in practice (i.e. what impact does training have on practice). Increasingly inspectors are making recommendations that organisations develop systems to measure the impact of training and ensure that learning about research and evidence-based outcomes is embedded in practice (e.g. Ofsted 2008, p. 13, 29). This interactive workshop will start with a brief presentation discussing the methodology and preliminary findings from an ongoing research project evaluating the impact of a mandatory internal training programme on practice within a social work service provider. This is an attempt to move beyond ‘on-the-day’ participant feedback forms to research (using both quantitative and qualitative data drawn from approximately 1500 employees) that measures the changes in practice as a result of using skills developed through training. The presentation will be followed by a facilitated discussion about the following key issues: What are the inevitable ‘trade-offs’ of doing this kind of ‘real world’ research? How can cost effective research about internal courses become part of systematic processes in social work so that it is embedded in the organisation? How can internal training become more research minded? How can the transfer of knowledge to practice best be measured?

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Self efficacy in research skills; becoming research minded

Presentation to 2008 JSWEC Conference. Informed by the work of Holden et al (1999, 2002) and Unrau and Grinnel (2005) research has been undertaken as part of the Evaluating the Outcomes of Social Work Education project funded by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) and the Higher Education Academy Social Policy and Social Work subject Centre (SWAP) to look at how undergraduates develop self efficacy in research skills. This 3 year project using undergraduate participants following a second year Using Research for Practice unit of study on a qualifying social work programme in England has explored the development of confidence in research skills. Data was collected from 3 consecutive cohorts of students, at the beginning (T1) and end (T2) of the unit of study and a comparison group was recruited from another university. The data was analysed using SPSS software. The project also provides a case study of research capacity building in academic staff with the project researchers being mentored by an experienced researcher experienced in this research methodology. This paper will explore the methodology and findings of the research project and will consider some implications and challenges for the teaching of research skills to qualifying students in order to develop research minded practitioners. References Holden G. Barker K. Meenaghan T. and Rosenberg G. 1999. Research self efficacy: a new possibility for educational outcome assessment. Journal of Social Work Education. Vol 35. Holden G,, Meenaghan T, Anastas J and Mtry G. 2002. Outcomes of social work education: the case for social work self efficacy. Journal of Social Work Education. Vol 38. Unrau Y.A. and Grinnell R.M. 2005. The impact of social work research courses on research self-efficacy for social work students. Social Work Education. Vol 24, no.6.

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The case for open access to social work research

Presentation to 10th JSWEC conference, Cambridge, 9th July 2008.

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Introductory Presentation to Homeless Awareness Day 2010

This PowerPoint presentation was used to introduce Homeless Awareness Day in Belfast in 2010. These slides would be very useful for anyone thinking or setting up a similar type of day in the UK.

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Assessment Feedback PowerPoint for Lecturers and Tutors

In response to the findings of a research project exploring student perceptions of assessment feedback we created a PowerPoint presentation which colleagues could easily embed in lectures and/or seminars. In addition, the Department of Policy Studies decided to add guidance about the purpose of assessment feedback to the coursework presentation and marking guide. Students were also provided with the opportunity to have a one-to-one feedback session with members of academic staff about their work and the assessment feedback provided.

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This list was generated on Thu Jan 17 12:28:12 2019 GMT.